Weekly holiday review: 16th October 2020

By | Category: Travel news

This has been the week of the bans.

Crete has now been removed from the quarantine list

Wales is banning visitors from high risk regions of the UK entering the principality. Ireland has banned households meeting together in many of its counties. Scotland is talking of following the Welsh ban and the three tier system in England means many are advised not to travel amongst a raft of other measures.

We are effectively banned from visiting Italy, San Marino, the Vatican City and the French island of Martinique because quarantine rules will apply on our return. In Greece, only Mykonos remains of the quarantine list of all four home nations.

A group of travel related groups including IATA, ACI have voiced annoyance at the decision by the EU not to immediately introduce airport testing as a way around quarantine and, all the time, tempers fray and travel becomes even more difficult.

True there was some good news meaning residents of all the home nations can now visit Crete and Anguilla. Singapore and Hong Kong announced a travel corridor between the two cities but agreement has been in principle rather than in practice. But the corridor between Australia and New Zealand has started with the first three flights landing in Sydney today.

But lockdowns or circuit breakers – call them what you will – seem to be the fashion so travel will become even more difficult than it is now. Winter holidays seem to be unlikely so it is to late spring and summer than people will now turn.

Consequently this will be the last weekly update on holiday possibilities just because it is looks irrelevant for the foreseeable future.

When Ireland reduced those on its Green List last week to zero and both France and Germany virtually introducing curfews in many destinations that visitors would travel where is there left to go without facing quarantine, PCR testing or the closing down of attractions, galleries, museums, bars and restaurants?

In the UK, it appears that numbers for staycations are down by just under 50% so what should have been a bumper year for domestic holidays turns out not to be so. The ban to be enforced by Wales and introduced by Scotland and Ireland means staycations will be limited over winter as well.

Following is news from some destinations Britons and Irish visit

Antigua and Barbuda – Long arrival delays are forecast as when visitors arrive they must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken no more than seven days before arrival. Additional health screening is in place at the airport and may be subject to last minute change. They include mandatory temperature, travel history checks, completion of a Health Declaration Form and further testing for Coronavirus. Before booking accommodation, passengers should check that where they are staying is on the government’s approved list. https://visitantiguabarbuda.com/antigua-and-barbuda-is-open/

Cape Verde – Visitors may enter but must have a negative COVID-19 test issued in the 72 hours before arrival. Without this, entry may be denied.

France – Two more French cities, Toulouse and Montpellier have been added to the maximum alert list as from last Tuesday.

Germany – Some major cities like Berlin and Frankfurt (which are two cities giving the greatest concern to the government) now have to close bars, cafes and restaurants at 11pm each night.

Italy – A negative COVID test is required (taken within 72 hours of travel) to be shown when you arrive in Italy from the UK. There is some testing facilities but only at some airports so advice is to take the test before travelling.

Jamaica – All arrivals have to have had a PCR test before arrival. A curfew is in place but is being relaxed slightly from October 20th so that it runs from 9pm to 5am. All people over 70 should self-isolate.

Latvia – From 12 October, everyone who intends to enter Latvia is required to complete and submit an electronic form no earlier than 48 hours before entering Latvia. This is not a requirement for a PCR test but you do have to swear that you have no ailments  

Slovenia – From 12 October, the Slovenian authorities have added Gibraltar, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales to their Red List.  In additional the following regions of England are also added: Northern and North West England and Yorkshire and Humberside. All visitors from these areas of the UK must undergo 10 days of quarantine or hold a negative Covid-19 test that is no more than 48 hours old. There are some exemptions. The remainder of the UK is on the Amber List meaning that you will not be required to go into quarantine if you arrive before 31st of December or you have a confirmed negative Covid-19 test from an EU country that was administered within 48 hours of arrival in Slovenia.

South Korea – On 12 October the government reduced its social distancing requirements to level one, but all arrivals are still required to undergo quarantine for 14 days and foreign visitors are now required to be tested for COVID-19 in South Korea.

In measuring the number of cases registered each week in comparison to the previous week, may Just about Travel remind readers that we are using the 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 as revealed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control website. Even these figures are misleading because they are country wide and many outbreaks are regional.

Both the Irish and British governments are looking at destinations where the upsurge per 100,000 cases over a 14-day rolling period is greater than their own countries.

In cases where it is substantially higher, potential holidaymakers and travellers must make their own minds up as to whether their governments might impose a “don’t fly” ban and what effect that would have on them.

 Remember also that countries we might want to visit and are allowed to do so might ban UK and Irish residents because of the increasing levels of infection at home. This week Germany said that visitors from Northern Ireland and Wales would have to quarantine so further moves by other countries can be expected.


As a benchmark the latest 14 day figure for Ireland is 200.5 up from 124.2 last week, and for the UK it is 320.3 almost doubling from 218.2.

Austria – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 163.1 up on last week’s 128.2.

Belgium – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 577.9up more than double last week’s 277.7.

Croatia -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 140 up from last week’s 83.8

Cyprus – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 86.7 more than doubling from 29.1.

Czech Republic (Czechia) – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 701.9. up from 398 and the highest in this list

Denmark – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 96.9 down from 107.5

Estonia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 40 up from 51.6

Finland – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 52.4 up from 35.6

France – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 346.5 up from 260.2

Germany -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 65.2up from 41.5.

Greece – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 47.2 up from 44.3

Italy – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 106.4 nearly doubling from 56.5

Latvia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 61.9 up over last week’s 40.4

Lithuania – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is up at 70.7 from 55.7

Malta – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 214.2 down from 123.2.

Netherlands -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 461.4 up from 304.3.

Norway – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 36.1, hardly up from last week’s 32

Poland -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 148.6 nearly double from 75.8.

Portugal – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 164.4 up from 110.7

Romania – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 200 up from 142.4

Slovakia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 243.8 up from 148.6

Slovenia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 231.6 up from 129.5

Spain – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 304.2 a small drop from 307

Sweden – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 83.8 up from 68.8



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