Weekly holiday review 4th September 2020

By | Category: Travel news

If you thought that quarantine restrictions were confused last week, then this week they are mired in disagreement between the four nations.

Funchal, in Madeira, Still open to visitors from England, Northern Ireland and Wales but not Scotland

If you live in England and Northern Ireland then you are unaffected by new changes.

If you live in Scotland, then any traveller from any part of French Polynesia, Greece or Portugal will have to self-quarantine for fourteen days. This comes into effect from 4am on Saturday 5th of September.

If you live in Wales then a fourteen day quarantine period began at 4am this morning, Friday 4th of September for those returning from Gibraltar, French Polynesia, mainland Portugal (not the Azores or Madeira) or from six Greek islands; Antiparos, Crete, Lesvos (Lesbos), Mykonos, Paros and Zakynthos (Zante.)

Following is some other news from destinations Britons visit

Belize, primarily a winter niche, sun destination for Britons but an all-round destination for North Americans, has announced that the main international airport will re-open on October 1st for international tourism again. About 15,000 Britons visit Belize each year.

Cuba is now on the UK’s green list for travel but the Cuban government does have restrictions on international visitors. You will only be allowed to fly in on charter flights and to Cayo Coco, Cayo Cruz or Cayo Guillermo (served by Jardines del Rey airport); Cayo Santa Maria (flying into Santa Clara airport), or Cayo Largo del Sur. Note that the capital, Havana, is not on the list.

Egypt remains on the “don’t fly” list but some people are still holidaying there. The Egyptian government now insists that all international visitors must present a negative PCR test certificate on arrival and which was carried out no more than 72 hours prior to flight departure. Children under the age of 6 are exempt.

If you’re arriving in Estonia (on the government’s green list) you need to self-isolate for 14 days but, from 1st of September, you have the option of taking a test to reduce your self-isolation period. This involves having a PCR test at the point of entry. If there is a negative result, you will have to self-isolate in a limited form but just for the first seven days. You will be allowed to go to work or undertakes shopping during these seven days

Tallinn, Estonia. Testing is now in place to reduce quarantine times

Hungary effectively isolated itself as from September 1st. On that date it banned all international visitors entering the country. About 700,000 Britons travel to Hungary each year according to the FCO Travel website so although Hungary remains on the UK’s green list, you will be unable to enter. The Hungarian government says the ban will last at least a month.

Malaysia is another country on the UK government’s safe to travel or green list. Except that the country has isolated itself apart from Malaysians returning home. It looks like this ban will remain for the rest of the year so write Malaysia off you holiday destination list for 2020.

If you plan on visit9ng the Maldives this autumn or winter then you should be aware that as from the 10th of September, all tourists and short term visitors must present a negative PCR test for COVID-19 on arrival to Maldives. In addition all travellers should fill in a health declaration form 24 hours before they leave their home country to fly to the Maldives.

The British Virgin Islands, a UK territory, has announced that as from Wednesday 2nd of September, there is a mandatory and total lockdown from 1.01pm and 5am. During the eight hours between 5am and 1pm everyone must wear a mask after leaving their homes and movement is restricted to shopping, medical trips and work. Beaches will close at midday

yacht in ocean off BVI
Trunk Bay in the British Virgin Islands. The BVI ow has a total lockdown for two-thirds of the day

In measuring the number of cases registered each week in comparison to the previous week, may Just about Travel remind readers that we are using the 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 as revealed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control website. Even these figures are misleading because they are country wide and many outbreaks are regional.

From this week, Just about Travel will include countries on the “don’t fly” lists so readers can see the scale of infections. We still only list the most popular holiday destinations in Europe.

Both the Irish and British governments are looking at destinations where the upsurge per 100,000 cases over a 14-day rolling period is greater than their own countries.

In cases where it is substantially higher, potential holidaymakers and travellers must make their own minds up as to whether their governments might impose a “don’t fly” ban and what effect that would have on them.

As a benchmark the latest 14 day figure for Ireland is 31.2 up slightly from 31.1 last week, and for the UK it is 27.2 up from 23.2.

Austria – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 43.9 up on last week’s 41.2.

Belgium – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 48.7 up slightly on last week’s 47.7.

Croatia -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 92.4 up from last week’s 77.1.

Cyprus – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 11.8 down from 20.4.

Czech Republic (Czechia) – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 50.8 up from 36.6

Denmark – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 22.7 down from 24.3

Estonia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 16.4 up from 11.4

Finland – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 6.5 marginally up from 6.1

France – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 105 up from 75.1.

Germany -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 19.3 down from 20.9.

Greece – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 28.6 slightly down from 29.4

Italy – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 27.8 up from 19.4.

Latvia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 4.3 up from 3.1.

Lithuania – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is up slightly at 16.1 from 15.5

Malta – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 92.4 down from 116.1.

Netherlands -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 42.8 down by a whisker from 42.9.

Norway – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 16.4 up from 13.6

Poland -14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 25.7 down slightly from 26.

Portugal – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 39.5 up from 30.4

Slovakia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 19.5 up from 16.3

Slovenia – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 24.3 up from 20.3

Spain – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 235.6 up from 196.4

Sweden – 14-day cumulative number of COVID-19 cases per 100 000 is 24.9 down from 31.9

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