BA and a brewery story

By | Category: Travel rumblings

Readers are familiar with the phrase that somebody/company couldn’t organise a p*** up in a brewery.

tal fins of British Airways planes

British Airways are demonstrating that ability to an astonishing degree.

Not only did they notify people that their flights were cancelled due to a strike by pilots, they cancelled flights around the dates because, presumably, planes would be in the wrong locations otherwise.

But then they sent out e-mails to some of those people saying their flights weren’t cancelled. But when those e-mails were sent out BA didn’t bother to give contact details resulting in the main phone lines/website pages being used as people tried to find out what was going on.

In some cases this came too late for people because they had moved quickly to re-book being aware that you need to move fast as there will be many other people trying to do the same thing.

Twitter and social media sites are recording that people have tried to get through to BA dozens of time to no avail. The airline says they have fielded 40,000 calls as though that is some sort of positive response to show they are trying hard to resolve the issue.

Rubbish!

To resolve the issue you use a call centre so that everyone can be answered quickly. And if you haven’t sufficient capacity you go and sub-contract the work to another call-centre that is used to fielding flight plan questions.

Here we are on Monday morning and at least one reader has yet to hear from BA. They have a flight booked to Salzburg in Austria on September 10th so that is definitely cancelled. But their return flight is not on a strike day so they are trying to contact BA to cancel the flight out but not the return leg. That is proving tough on the website which thinks people should be cancelling both legs of a trip rather than just one.

If there was a customer service award for the most cocked-up bit of business then BA would surely walk away it!

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