Returning Stonehenge

By | Category: Travel rumblings
Stonehenge

Stonehenge

At the Hay Festival at the beginning of June it is reported by the Daily Telegraph that an archaeologist, Mike Parker Pearson from University College London said that Stonehenge was originally a mass tomb in Wales.

Archaeologists have already identified precisely where the stone were quarried in the Preseli mountain range in north Pembrokeshire and now that they have identified haf a million bone fragments linked to Wales, the time has come to demand that Stonhenge be returned to Wales. ltural and historical Welsh heritage and on this day, the summer solstice when people have foregathered at Stonehenge to see the sun rise, it seems an appropriate day to demand that the stones be removed and rebuilt on the Preseli mountains.

If Maori remains can be returned to New Zealand, Aboriginal remains to Australia and native wares returned to various countries around the globe, then those  500,000 bone fragments of Welsh ancestors should be returned with the stones so that they can become a shrine to Welsh heritage.

Under article 12 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, “states shall seek to enable the access and/or repatriation of ceremonial objects and human remains in their possession through fair, transparent and effective mechanisms developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned.” Enough said! Send the bones and stones back so the summer and winter solstices can be celebrated where they were originally meant to be – up a mountain which, although often shrouded in mist, gives it an ethereal, mystic reality.

For those living near Salisbury Plain, the removal of Stonehenge will bring peace and quiet; for those using the A303, traffic will be cut at a stroke and for those who want something local to preserve and show to the world, go to Amesbury. The government won’t have to widen the A303 so there is a money saving as well.

For the Welsh it will bring employment to an area that could do with more work opportunities. All that traffic will mean that the Welsh government will finally have to improve the roads in West Wales and not just talk about it. Hotels can dot the landscape like wind turbines do because all those coach parties from London won’t be able to get back in a day forcing visitors to stay overnight. Cardiff Airport can get some decent international flights so that visitors will be closer to Stonehenge in Wales than Heathrow allows and the local druids won’t have to traipse to Salisbury Plain twice a year; they can just catch the 344 bus!

Seems like a win, win to me.

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