Solving travel sickness

By | Category: Travel tips & opinions
If the researc is proven, all this will be replaced by a much simpler solution. Image © Imperial College

If the researc is proven, all this will be replaced by a much simpler solution. Image © Imperial College

From Imperial College in London comes some potentially good news for those who suffer from travel sickness.

Research there led by Dr Qadeer Arshad seems to show that a mild electrical current to the head can reduce responses in an area of the brain that is responsible for processing motion signals making the brain think that everything is normal.

The reason that we shouldn’t get too excited yet is that the research was done only twenty people so some people think the sample size might be too small for the research to be definitive. But there will be a larger study that will be conducted and that should be more persuasive.

Dr Ashad is quoted as saying that the team is confident that within five to ten years people will be able to walk into the chemist and buy an anti-seasickness device. He went on to say that they hope it might even integrate with a mobile phone, which would be able to deliver the small amount of electricity required via the headphone jack. In either case, you would temporarily attach small electrodes to your scalp before travelling.

No-one really knows how many people are affected by motion sickness whether it be on a plane, ship, car or even a train. Bad weather affects the number travelling by air or sea so given the conditions, pretty much everyone could be affected. Such a treatment that could be controlled by a mobile phone would be of benefit as almost everyone has one.

I can’t provide a direct link to the journal, Neurology, because it is a subscription based academic journal but this link will take to Imperial College and an article about the research.

 

 

 

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, please consider subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.
Tags: , , ,