Young Britons vote Big Ben as their top British landmark

By | Category: Travel news

Young Britons are traditionalists at heart who are keen to explore their country’s heritage according to findings from a new children’s tourism report.

Hotel chain, Travelodge polled 2,500 youngsters to attain their views on which British attractions they rate as the most iconic landmarks. Surprisingly young Britons predominately chose historical sites above modern attractions with the 153 year old, world’s largest four-faced clock, Big Ben topping the poll.

Big Ben

Second place was awarded to the 5,000 year old stone monument ‘Stonehenge’ and The Tower of London, home to the crown jewels which was built nearly a millennium ago, took third place in the top 10 listing.

Buckingham Palace which has served as the official London residence of Britain’s sovereigns since 1837 reached fourth place. Fifth place was awarded to Europe’s largest ferris wheel, The London Eye – marking the only modern day attraction to make the poll.

The remainder of the listing was largely made up of landmarks built in the 1800s or before. In sixth place was Blackpool Tower, which was built in May 1894 and took its inspiration from the Eiffel Tower and in seventh place was Windsor Castle, which was originally built by William the Conqueror in the decade after the Norman conquest of 1066. Eighth position was taken by Hadrian’s Wall, the best known frontier in the entire Roman Empire which began construction in 122 AD.

The final places were taken up by Edinburgh Castle, which was built in the mid 1700s and is perched on an extent volcano and the famous White Cliffs of Dover – the only natural landmark to make the top ten list.

Further research findings revealed that following a patriotic summer which showcased how great, Great Britain really is, following the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations and a summer of sport, a third of British youngsters said they believe it is important for them to explore their homeland.

In response to this growing interest, over a third of British kids have asked their parents if they can visit a museum or an art gallery during the half term break – in comparison just one in five kids have requested a trip to a theme park.

Jessica Ennis

In pursuit of obtaining a better understating of the UK’s rich cultural history young Britons were asked which part of the UK they would most like to visit, topping the poll were cities steeped in history which included: London, Edinburgh, Liverpool and Bath.

Further research findings revealed that 37 per cent of British parents find it very stressful keeping their children entertained during the half term break and welcome their children’s new desire for British history – as it is an inexpensive form of entertainment.

This half term break, parents will be forking out at on average around £50 a day from their tight household budget to keep their kids entertained. To help make ends meet over a third of parents revealed that for the last couple of months they have been scouring newspapers and websites for money off vouchers to help run their household budget during the school break. A fifth of parents admitted that they have encouraged their children to search for money off coupons too.

0saves
If you enjoyed this post, please consider subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,