The 12 Days of Christmas

By | Category: Travel rumblings

UPDATE 17 December: the courts have ruled the strike illegal because the balloting of union members had not been correctly carried out. This means that the 12 day strike cannot now take place.

I’m not concerned in taking sides in this argument. For one thing I don’t know enough since all I see and hear is the propaganda from either side. My interest is in the passengers. Over 12 days, some 7000 flights might be axed. That could easily involve over a million passengers.
At Christmas, the time when people get together whether they like it or not, fares are often at their most expensive. Passengers save up so that they can return to their families. They put up with even busier than usual airports and now they must face the task or either rebooking, maybe at an even more expensive rate as they try to get the last few seats, or take a refund and stay at home. But why should anyone on either side care about that? Passengers are only those who pay the bills so that both management and strikers have jobs.
If this strike goes ahead, it may take quite a while to repair the damage and reputation of both sides. The biggest question is why such a long strike? Tube workers in London have perfected the 24 hour strike that effectively affects travel on 2 days. Postal workers pull one group out one day and a different group another day so that the employees lose as little pay as possible. Apart from the miners strike of 25 years ago and the Grunwick strike of 30 years ago I can’t think of many lengthier strikes.
Some will say that this a just cause be it the unions or the management. And you know what? The passenger doesn’t care. We aren’t going to read through acres of news or listen endlessly to commentators analysing every word uttered. We are going to get bored and say a plague on both your houses.

Get it sorted or lose our business.

And if that means there is no British Airways so be it. There will always be another airline willing to take over.

 

UPDATE 17 December: the courts have ruled the strike illegal because the balloting of union members had not been correctly carried out. this means that the 12 day strike cannot now take place.

 

 

 

 

 

The carol, The Twelve Days of Christmas, takes on a new meaning this year since it coincides with the number of days of strike action at British Airways. And I won’t be the last to wonder whether the number was particularly chosen by the strikers in order to ram home the iniquity of goodwill to all men excepting for British Airways passengers.

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